G IV Wellness

Stationery

G IV Wellness (in “G IV,” that’s letter G, Roman numeral four) is a nonprofit organization that promotes healthy nutrition and physical fitness to youth in under-served communities in the Baltimore, Maryland area. I designed a set of stationery for G IV Wellness and made some tweaks to the organization’s logo.

Logo Improvements

G IV Wellness requested me to make some minor touch-ups to its logo (which I hadn’t designed) without doing a total re-design. The main adjustments I did included:

When the client provided me the original image of the logo, it was in the JPG format and its dimensions weren’t very large. This was a problem, because raster graphic formats such as JPG can’t be enlarged without getting blurry, and this logo would be needed in a very large size to be put on banners for future events. I fixed this problem by converting the whole raster-based logo into the vector-based AI (Adobe Illustrator) format, thus giving the logo the ability to be scaled up to any size while preserving the sharpness in the picture quality.

Stationery Design

After editing the G IV Wellness logo, I started working on the set of stationery, which included the following items:

The client requested that I make the stationery’s design look professional and not too flashy. As I was creating the initial mockups for each stationery item in Adobe Photoshop, I purposely made the design similar among all the stationery to establish uniformity in the G IV branding. The text in all the stationery plus the logo use the same font, Open Sans. The stationery design was based on the color scheme and design elements of the logo, particularly the dark blue ribbon with yellow borders.

For each of the stationery items except the business card, I made them as templates for Microsoft Word, as the client requested. Although I actually didn’t have Microsoft Word, I did have LibreOffice Writer (a free word processor similar to Microsoft Word), which was able to save documents as compatible Word templates. For mass printing, the business card was required to be exported as PDF document with a bleed of one-eighth of an inch.